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The podcast about the mind for people who think

Mar 6, 2017

In this episode, I talk with Dr Ute Kreplin who is based at Massey University's School of Psychology in New Zealand.  In this conversation, we focus on Ute's work on the Centre Stage effect. 

Here is the link to the paper we talk about in this week's show:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/265386572_Looking_behaviour_and_preference_for_artworks_The_role_of_emotional_valence_and_location

And fortunately, you can find the full paper at this link too. 

Here is the abstract for some context:

The position of an item influences its evaluation, with research consistently finding that items occupying central locations are preferred and have a higher subjective value. The current study investigated whether this centre-stage effect (CSE) is a result of bottom-up gaze allocation to the central item, and whether it is affected by item valence. Participants (n = 50) were presented with three images of artistic paintings in a row and asked to choose the image they preferred. Eye movements were recorded for a subset of participants (n = 22). On each trial the three artworks were either similar but different, or were identical and with positive valence, or were identical and with negative valence. The results showed a centre-stage effect, with artworks in the centre of the row preferred, but only when they were identical and of positive valence. Significantly greater gaze allocation to the central and left artwork was not mirrored by equivalent increases in preference choices. Regression analyses showed that when the artworks were positive and identical the participants' last fixation predicted preference for the central art-work, whereas the fixation duration predicted preference if the images were different. Overall the result showed that item valence, rather than level of gaze allocation, influences the CSE, which is incompatible with the bottom-up gaze explanation. We propose that the centre stage heuristic, which specifies that the best items are in the middle, is able to explain these findings and the centre-stage effect.I hope you find our conversation interesting and thought-provoking.

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